Mentorship

Why Mentorship

The changing demographics of our society supports the need for more professionals to be trained and to become passionate about working with older adults. The mentorship program at Boston Bridge helps advance that goal by providing personal contact between members and established professionals.

Mentorship at Boston Bridge

March at Boston Bridge means Mentor Madness! How it works:

  1. Take a look at our 2020 Mentor List. We have many wonderful mentors across a range of disciplines.
  2. See someone you feel could contribute to your career interests or goals? Email Boston Bridge at bostonbridgeinc@gmail.com with the name(s) of mentors you might like to connect with.
  3. Barbara will do her best to make mentor matches and send you an e-introduction to you and your mentor.
  4. Follow up with your mentor to arrange a meeting. We suggest in-person, but know that’s not always possible.
  5. After an initial meeting, you and your mentor can decide how to proceed. Perhaps the one informational interview was helpful or maybe you want to arrange recurring meetings. Sustaining a healthy mentoring relationship does require a commitment to ongoing interaction between the mentor and mentee, but the frequency and mode of contact is up to the participants.
About the Mentorship Relationship*

A mentoring relationship is based on mutual collaboration and commitment to the professional growth of both participants. One participant may have more skills, experience, knowledge, and contacts than the other, but a good relationship allows for mutual respect and learning from each other. Such is the case with Boston Bridge mentors who, in their volunteer capacity, have exhibited abundant passion for the field of aging, and interest in its emerging professionals.

Mentors provide assistance with career growth at many stages: building a resume, advice with projects, identifying resources and career opportunities, introductions to their personal contacts, support when things are not going well and a pat-on-the-back when they do go well. Most leaders in society have had mentors that they credit as having been pivotal in their lives and their careers.

*Source:   www.commongoodcareers.org

Articles on the Value of a Mentorship Relationship

If you are interested in what our colleagues in other cities are doing, read about the mentorship program at Chicago Bridge.